• Malala Yousafzai: Our future Prime Minister?

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    Above is a remarkable photograph. Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, and their daughter Malia meet with Malala Yousafzai in the Oval Office, 11th October 2013.

    There are two particularly remarkable things about Malala Yousafzai: her survival of an assassination attempt and the enormous band wagon that has so quickly grown up around her.

    Whilst we are fully aware of Wikipedia’s failings, Readers can get a very good synopsis of this young woman’s life from this Wikipedia article:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malala_Yousafzai
    You will note that before the assassination attempt she was a BBC blogger and had an interest in left wing politics.

    Since making her home in Birmingham (her father has been given a job in the Pakistan Consulate there) she has very much become a political (small “P”) celebrity. You will note the long list of recognitions and awards that have been heaped upon her.

    This young woman was born on 12th July 1997. Which means she will be 18 and an adult in 2015. No doubt she will attend a British University.

    What is clear is this:

    - This young woman is being groomed for a political career. That career is unlikely to be in Pakistan. Those who have invested this much in this young woman will not want to see that capital squandered as a result of a successful assassination. It will be practically impossible to guard this young woman in Pakistan. She already is in receipt of full 24/7 armed protection from the West Midlands Police.

    - This young woman will be 30 in 2027. The demographics of the UK will by then be completely different. Those children starting school in September will be 18 in 2027. The Asian communities will be much larger. Politics may well by that time be sectarian. That British politics take on a sectarian nature in the now multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-cultural society has been the biggest fear of the establishment. The establishment have feared this when the scale of the potential demographic effects became apparent in the mid 1960s. Which is why parties such as the BNP are stamped on so hard.

    - The establishment now realise however that it is only a matter of time before sectarianism breaks out in Britain. There is nothing now they can do to stop it. They are already planning for the future. What the establishment want is a figure who will be able to form a coalition of moderate opinion. To bring moderate politicians representing the different communities people together. They look at Malala Yousafzai and see that figure.

    The British Gazette confidently expects Malala Yousafzai to apply for and get British Citizenship when she is eligible for it. After her degree she will continue to be politically active – we do not expect her to enter the political scene in the UK in the sense of joining a political party. She will remain above and outside party politics until the time is right. Initially, she will probably be employed in some sort of political research or campaigning organisation.